Evan Stone’s Battle Against Gay Porn Movie Piracy on Torrent Sites

Evan Stone, an anti-piracy lawyer from Texas, has started his campaign against P2P users illegally sharing gay porn via torrents.  He has filed over 4,500 cases against gay porn sharers and studios, possibly filing every case in Texas.

Stone gives judges IP address lists for them to write subpoenas to Internet provider, who then have to provide the names and addresses of the subscribers owning these IP addresses.  Once the lists are acquired, settlement letters are sent to the file sharers to indicate the amount needed to prevent Stone from filing a named lawsuit against them.  These lawsuits could cost around $150,000 per copyright infringement count.

Stone claims that his crusade is aimed to protect the artists.  His crusade began with gay pornographic movies – it has now spread to the anime community.

Evan Stone Begins His Crusade

Stone’s crusade began when he started a small record label that was Internet-based and artist-focused.  He aimed at having a 50-50 split with his artist, but the label soon failed.  They were overcome by the Napster file sharing program and had to close down the business.

Having a degree in film and five years experience as an app developer, his skills were more than adequate to trace and be in pursuit of net-based illegal users.  When he later attended law school, he specialized in entertainment law and soon became the in-house counsel for FUNimation. As his duties as legal counsel, he sent take down notices to anime distributors and moved forward with legal actions against some.  Usually, just flooding the file sharing websites with fake files posing as real anime movies was their way of ensuring that the copyrights were not violated.

The downside of this was, for torrent sites, they are mostly overseas and cannot be prosecuted due to jurisdictional problems.

Stone then also joined Locas Entertainment in 2010, who aimed to stop piracy of their gay-porn materials.  This venture showed significant results.

In September 2010, client Mick Haig Productions filed a lawsuit against 670 file-swappers, but the identities of these file-swappers are yet to be identified.  The only thing they held were ISPs of violators.

Evan Stone Pushes Forward

Stone made a mistake of sending out unapproved subpoenas to users.  The cases were dismissed, but Stone made grudging comments about how the judge, as well as the defense attorneys who opted to represent the unknown users, were “…renowned for defending Internet piracy and renowned for their general disregard for intellectual property law.”

Stone considers himself as different from the rest of the lawyers in his field.  His vast knowledge of the entertainment industry, as well as the Internet and specifically of BitTorrent, allows him inside knowledge in filing separate lawsuits to those specific people who are working together, as well as in isolating users who have been violating the intellectual property law.

After trolling sites like isohunt.com, kickasstorrents.com, and nyaatorrents.org, Stone’s investigator found 1,337 IP addresses to use in the case.  The work paid off in favor of FUNimation.  Each user with the One Piece episode having the file “b305c19f8e8bdab5e39b33a4ffc364a12beb110b” was sued.

As an interesting twist, Stone’s logo for his Copyright Defense Agency is similar to the East India Company Crest – which hired “mercenaries” which seafaring pirates were deathly scared of. For Evan Stone, his logo is a symbol of the anti-piracy movement he's spearheading.